Cheap Train Tickets to Nottingham

When people think of Nottingham, it’s quite likely that the first thing which comes to mind will be Robin Hood. While there’s no conclusive evidence that he existed, his story lives on in legend. There’s more to the city than just this, of course. There’s its sporting presence, a lot of history (particularly from the Industrial Revolution), its academic presence, and more. There’s more to the city than you may initially think.

Cheap Train Tickets to Nottingham
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Nottingham is well-connected to the rest of the UK by rail, with services from London, Birmingham, Crewe, Derby, Manchester, and Sheffield. Other perhaps less-well-known direct connections include those to Liverpool and Norwich. The station itself is connected to the Nottingham Express Transit (NET) tram network, which goes through the city centre, connecting it to the suburbs and surrounding area. For those coming from further afield, the city has a connection to East Midlands Airport via the nearby East Midlands Parkway station.

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Getting around Nottingham

Cheap Train Tickets to Nottingham
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There are a number of ways in which you can get around Nottingham, and we have detailed some of the key ones here for your reference.

·       Walk – Nottingham city centre is relatively compact and easy to get around on foot, which is ideal if you may be on more of a budget or don’t mind getting some exercise in while on your break to Nottingham. For information on walking around Nottingham, please visit the website page HERE.

·       Tram – The Nottingham Express Transit (NET) tram network runs through the city, connecting the station to the city centre, its suburbs, and the surrounding area. The system is easy to navigate, with plenty of ticket options available for a variety of passenger needs. Further information regarding NET can be found HERE.

·       Bus – Nottingham’s bus network is vast, with routes connecting the centre to the suburbs and further afield. As with the NET tram network, there are a variety of fares to suit different passenger needs. If you’d like more information on Nottingham’s bus network, then please visit Nottingham City Transport’s website HERE.

To plan your journeys around Nottingham and the surrounding area by bus, including real-time departures, download the Sojo app.

·       Taxi – There are a number of taxi companies running in Nottingham, and these can be convenient for passengers with restricted mobility or those who have a lot of luggage. The costs for travelling by taxi can mount up, however, so it’s worth bearing this in mind.

Getting the best-value rail tickets possible is something that we at Trainsplit are sure many people want to do. This can include booking in advance, using a Railcard if you have one, travelling outside peak times, and – of course – splitting tickets via our website. If you’d like further information on any of these, please get in touch, and we’ll do what we can to assist you.

We do have a comprehensive guide here at Trainsplit on the booking process, which we hope will be very useful, and we’ve covered some of the main points below.

How to slash your travel costs for Nottingham

Tickets to Nottingham
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  • Book early: The earlier you book, the more likely you are to find a good deal on train tickets. It may seem somewhat obvious, but booking in advance can really help you save money over the standard fare.

  • Be flexible with your travel dates: If you're flexible with your travel dates, you're more likely to find a good deal.

  • Travel off-peak: Travelling in the busiest times, such as during rush hours, can inflate prices. By travelling off-peak, you can usually get a much better deal, and the trains may also be quieter as well. If you’d like a more peaceful start/end to your break, then off-peak travel could be a very good choice for you to make.

  • Consider splitting your journey: If you're traveling a long distance, you may be able to save money by splitting your journey and taking two or more trains. You can easily do this on Trainsplit, a website that allows you to split your train journey into multiple tickets. This can often be a cheaper way to travel, as you can take advantage of different fares for different parts of your journey. In 2022, one of our customers enjoyed an extraordinary discount of 95.64% off their train journey. Imagine paying only £8.06 for excellent-value tickets that would have cost you £187.70 elsewhere! You could put the savings on your train tickets towards your hotel, a nice meal, or visit one of the city’s many attractions.


    To use Trainsplit, simply enter your travel dates and the website will show you the different options available. You can then choose the option that best suits your needs and budget.


    Here are some of the benefits of using Trainsplit:
    - You can often save money on your train tickets, making your journey even better value.
    - It's a convenient way to book your tickets.
    - You can be sure that you're getting the best deal.

  • Railcard discounts: If you don’t have a Railcard, then it’s worth looking into getting one. There are many different types, and most will offer about a third off the price of most fares. If you’re planning on making a lot of journeys, or are travelling a long way, then it’s definitely worth investigating – it may not take much effort for the Railcard to pay for itself through making your tickets even cheaper.

  • Look for discounted group fares: Take a look at Groupsave train tickets – these are a great way to get discounted train fares for groups of between 3 and 9 people travelling.

    Consider an alternative route: Sometimes, the cheapest way to travel is not the most direct route. For example, if you're traveling from London to Liverpool, you might be able to save money by traveling via Birmingham or Manchester.
There are a few things to keep in mind when considering an alternative route:
- The total travel time may be longer.
- You may need to change trains at one or more stations.
- The alternative route and timings may not be as convenient.
However, if you're on a tight budget, it's worth considering an alternative route to save money on your train ticket. 


Trainsplit is the only site that finds you cheaper alternative journeys not shown on other sites. It's a great way to save money on your train travel, especially if you're flexible with your travel dates and times. To use Trainsplit, simply enter your travel details and it will show you a list of alternative routes with the cheapest prices.

  • Claim Delay Repay compensation for any delays on your journey: If you are delayed on your journey, you may be entitled to delay compensation on your train tickets. By using these tips along with Trainsplit's unique journey planner to search for the best train ticket deals, now is the time to explore new destinations.

If you have any other questions, then our FAQ section can be a good place to start. If your question doesn’t appear there, then feel free to get in touch with our customer service team.


The Trainsplit app is more than just a way to save money on train travel. It's a great way to explore new places and meet new people.

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So what is there to do in Nottingham? Well, read on and find out.

Sport

Cricket
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Nottingham has a sizeable sporting presence in the UK. It’s arguably most well-known for football, with Notts County and Nottingham Forest occupying grounds (Meadow Lane and the City Ground respectively) close to each other on opposite sides of the River Trent. They’re both about 1.5 miles from Nottingham station, and multiple buses run from the city centre. Arguably the city’s biggest football success was when Nottingham Forest won the European Cup (now the UEFA Champions League) in 1979 and 1980 under the managerial reign of Brian Clough.

Just to the south of the City Ground is the home of Nottinghamshire County Cricket Club, Trent Bridge, which takes its name from the nearby bridge over the River Trent. Trent Bridge has played host to a number of international Test matches over the years, including 22 matches in the Ashes series between England and Australia, with the first Ashes test at the ground taking place in 1899. If you’re interested in going on a tour of Trent Bridge, then these are available, with further information HERE.

If you enjoy ice hockey, then why not visit the National Ice Centre (nearest station is Nottingham, and nearest NET tram stop is Lace Market)? The NIC also has a public ice rink, and adjoins the Motorpoint Arena. The city’s links with ice-skating go back to Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean, known for winning gold in the ice dance event at the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo. Other sports with a presence in the city include rugby union, rugby league, and tennis.

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Are you a Sports Fan? Trainsplit has partnered with Pledgeball, a grassroots charity that rallies fellow fans to take action to protect where we play, making changes that improve our air and our green spaces. It can be as simple as swapping to reusable water bottles or taking the train to a match instead of driving. Fans, players, clubs, grassroots teams – the impact we can have together is game-changing.

History

Nottingham Castle
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Nottingham’s history dates back to the tenth century, with Nottingham Castle (nearest station is Nottingham) being constructed in 1068. During the Industrial Revolution, the city became known for its manufacture of lace, and one of the key areas where this happened is now known as Lace Market.

Also found on Lace Market is the Georgian-era Shire Hall, which is home to the National Justice Museum. Historically, this site housed courtrooms, a prison, and a police station. Today, the museum has exhibits on the history of crime and justice in the UK, and included in the general admission is a mock trial.

Just around the corner from the National Justice Museum, and run by the same charity, is the City of Caves, which date back to around 1250. The Caves have had many uses over the years, including as a medieval tannery and as an air raid shelter during the Second World War.

Also of note is that the city has three public houses which each claim to be the oldest in the country – Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem near Nottingham Castle (nearest station is Nottingham), the Bell Inn on Old Market Square (nearest NET tram stop is Old Market Square), and Ye Olde Salutation Inn on Maid Marian Way (nearest NET tram stop is Old Market Square). One of the most well-known figures of the 19th century to come from Nottingham is William Booth, who – along with his wife Catherine – founded the Salvation Army in 1865.

Culture

Nottingham Trains
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It may not be the first name on people’s lists, but Nottingham’s contribution to the culture of the UK cannot be overlooked. It has a number of theatres, with two of the largest being Nottingham Playhouse (nearest NET tram stop is Royal Centre) and the Theatre Royal, with the latter being part of the Royal Centre alongside the nearby Royal Concert Hall (nearest NET tram stop for these is Royal Centre). There are also a number of smaller venues around the city.

For music, Nottingham has a number of venues. By far the largest is the Motorpoint Arena (nearest NET tram stop is Lace Market), which has played host to many acts over the years, including Simply Red, Ed Sheeran, Katy Perry, One Direction, Busted, and many more. There’s also ‘Rock City’, which is just around the corner from the Theatre Royal. The venue opened in 1980, and the main act that night was the Undertones. Many other groups have played at Rock City over the years, including Ozzy Osbourne, Nirvana, Oasis, and many more. The venue does host upcoming bands, so it can be a good place to visit if you want to hear something new.

One of Nottingham’s most well-known annual events is the Goose Fair, which dates back to when a Royal Charter was issued in 1284, though its roots may be even earlier than this. The event is held in October of every year at the Forest Recreation Ground (nearest NET tram stop is The Forest), and is one of the largest travelling funfairs in the UK, with rides and attractions for all ages.

Cheap Tickets to Nottingham
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Food

Nottingham DiningImage credit: Web Photographeer | Getty Images Signature

When people are going somewhere for a trip of any reasonable length, one thing we’re sure is high on the priority list is options regarding food. As with any city, Nottingham has a variety of restaurants to suit all budgets and differing cuisines, so we’re confident you’ll find something you enjoy.

Cheap eats

Hungry Pumpkin

Address: 38 High Pavement, Nottingham, NG1 1HN

For breakfast and lunch, the Hungry Pumpkin (nearest NET tram stop is Lace Market) is a popular choice. Breakfast options include the traditional English breakfast, with vegetarian & vegan options available, and also a ‘Chorizo Special’ (chorizo, avocado, poached eggs, sourdough – a vegetarian option is available where the chorizo is replaced by halloumi). There are other popular items including toast, breakfast rolls, and porridge. Lunch options are plentiful, with a wide variety of rolls, sandwiches, ciabatta, and panini available to choose from. Alternatively, why not consider one of the wraps, a pasta dish, jacket potatoes, salad, or an omelette with a variety of fillings to choose from?

Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem

Address: 1 Brewhouse Yard, Castle Road, Nottingham, NG1 6AD

Partially built into the rockwork underneath Nottingham Castle, Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem (nearest station is Nottingham) is purported to be the oldest public house in the UK – a claim shared by two other public houses in the city. Regardless, it’s still a popular location for food and drink. The pub itself is part of Greene King, which is great if you want something more familiar in a place with character. The food on offer is fairly typical pub grub, with starters including chicken wings, battered halloumi, and a baked British Camembert sharing starter. For mains, why not go for the classic fish & chips, a pulled mushroom chilli, or maybe opt for something a bit more retro in the form of a Chicken Kyiv? A number of burgers are also available to choose from, including a Korean chicken burger and a Beyond Meat® vegan burger. For dessert, they have dishes including apple pie, sticky toffee pudding, and also a British cheese board for anyone who wishes to end their meal on something perhaps a little bit different.

 

Prickly Pear

Address: 127 Mansfield Road, Nottingham, NG1 3FQ

Located to the north of the city centre (nearest NET tram stop is Nottingham Trent University), Prickly Pear is a lovely café open all day focusing on vegetarian & vegan food, with a variety of dishes to choose from that are sure to whet your appetite. Breakfast options include avocado toast, hash browns & chorizo, the ‘big breakfast’ (sausage, bacon, baked beans, homemade hash brown, tofu scramble, vine tomatoes, avocado, granary toast and sunflower seeds with tea or coffee) – many of these can also be made gluten-free. The lunch menu is small, but varied, including a ‘Jack n grilled’ (Cheddar grilled cheese sandwich with slow-cooked BBQ jackfruit and spinach) and a ‘seitan Caesar salad’ (lettuce, sliced seitan fried chicken, Caesar dressing, croutons, and grated hard cheese). The lunch options can be upgraded to include chips or the soup of the day. Other dishes on the menu include mac & cheese (topped with melted cheese and a sriracha drizzle, with the option to add a few more toppings if desired), three different kinds of taco, and four different burgers (all of which are served on a toasted brioche bun with skin-on fries).

 

Mid-range

Le Mistral Sherwood

Address: 575 Mansfield Road, Nottingham, NG5 2JN

Found in the northern suburbs of the city, Le Mistral Sherwood is roughly half a mile from Nottingham City Hospital. It serves French cuisine in a lovely bistro-style atmosphere. The menu itself is extensive, with a number of dishes included in a two-course set-price menu for anyone who may be on a more restricted budget. Starters include French onion soup, pâté (duck, pork liver, and orange), and beetroot tartare (served with shallots, capers, Dijon mustard, and warm bread). For main courses, these are covered by selections such as moules marinière, bœuf bourguignon, and confit duck cassoulet. There’s also a separate plant-based & vegan mains section, which includes harissa & coconut tagine (spiced chickpeas, mixed peppers, spinach & sweet potato, with fragrant lemon & coriander rice). If you have a sweet tooth, then you have a number of delicious options, including tarte au citron (served with crème fraiche and honey), crème brûlée, and Belgian chocolate torte (served with vanilla ice-cream and chocolate sauce). The wine list is also very good, with a particular focus on French wines, and a number from other parts of the world – it’s also worth knowing that the vegan-friendly wines are highlighted as such on the menu.

 

Kayal

Address: 8 Broad Street, Nottingham, NG1 3AL

Sited on the edge of the city centre, and a short walk from Lace Market NET tram stop, Kayal is a great place for those who are fans of Indian cuisine but may want something slightly different. Kayal makes clear any menu items which are vegetarian/vegan and/or gluten-free. The selection of starters is varied, with ‘uzhunnu vada’ (golden fried lentil doughnuts), Cochin squid (deep-fried squid rings served with chutney), and ‘fish cutlet’ (Kerala fish fillets and potatoes with spices made into a patty and fried) being among the choices. For main courses, why not consider the chicken/lamb dosa (rice & lentil pancaked filled with chicken or lamb cubes, tomatoes, green chillies, onions)? Also available is the ‘Kayal fish curry’ (boneless fish in coconut-flavoured sauce), ‘Kumarakom duck roast’ (boneless duck breast cooked in Kumarakom style with aromatic spices and herbs), and ‘Cheera erachi curry’ (tender pieces of lamb cooked in fresh spinach, aromatic spices, turmeric, red chillies, and onions – this is also noted as being the chef’s signature dish). There are also desserts on the menu, including popular Indian classics such as gulab jamun and kulfi.

 

Casa Italian Restaurant & Bar

Address: Unit 4, The Axis, 110 Upper Parliament Street, Nottingham, NG1 6LF

Found a short walk from the Royal Centre NET tram stop, Casa is a delightful restaurant for anyone who enjoys Italian food. Given its location, it’s a good option for anyone attending an event at the Theatre Royal or Royal Concert Hall, and there’s a fixed-price menu available, which is good for anyone who may be on a tighter budget. Antipasti options include classics such as bruschetta, caprese, and calamari fritti. If you wish to share starters, then it’s worth considering one of the sharing boards, which include antipasto (a selection of dry cured Italian meats with buffalo mozzarella) and ‘frittura mista’ (a selection of deep-fried seafood). Main courses include dishes such as lasagne, risotto tartufo (Carnaroli rice with porcini mushrooms and black truffle sauce), agnello Toscana (lamb rump, Barolo red wine, rosemary, sun-blushed tomato sauce, fresh seasonal vegetables), and tagliatelle anatra (duck breast, brandy, porcini mushrooms, demi-glace, cream, rosemary). Dessert fans have a good amount of choice, with tiramisu, chocolate fondant served with Italian ice-cream, and ‘crostata della nonna’ (rich pastry base filled with custard and toasted almonds, sprinkled with icing sugar and pine nuts, served with Italian ice-cream) being among the options. The wine list is great, with many options from Italy and beyond, and vegan-friendly options are also highlighted.

 

Fine dining

Restaurant Sat Bains

Address: Lenton Lane, Nottingham, NG7 2SA

South-west of the city centre, you can find Restaurant Sat Bains (nearest station is Beeston), a prime example of fine dining in Nottingham. Not only does the restaurant have two Michelin stars, it also has a green Michelin star for gastronomy and sustainability. The restaurant is small, with an emphasis on sourcing high-quality seasonal produce, and there are also a variety of bedrooms available for those who may wish to stay overnight. There are a number of menus available, with one of them stretching to a mammoth fifteen courses, and the restaurant also has some separate dining areas for a truly special dining experience. Menu items can change depending on availability of produce, but the sample menus on the website demonstrate what the restaurant can offer. These include potato with caviar and ash, monkfish with mooli and a red wine sauce, Dover sole with autumn truffle and turnip, pigeon with peach and nasturtium, ceps with mushroom ketchup and truffle, chocolate tart á la minute, and jasmine with yuzu, dried milk, and raspberry. The wine list is extensive, with pairing options available to go alongside the tasting menus.

 

Marco Pierre White Steakhouse Bar & Grill

Address: 33 Wollaton Street, Nottingham, NG1 5FW

Marco Pierre White is one of the UK’s most renowned chefs and restauranteurs, and a number of restaurants bear his name, with one such example being found on Wollaton Street (nearest NET tram stop is Royal Centre). As the name would suggest, the restaurant specialises in steaks, with a number of different cuts available to choose from, including fillet, ribeye, and sirloin. There are also sharing steaks such as the tomahawk and the chateaubriand. Other main courses include classic fish & chips (fillet of cod, sauce tartare, Koffmann chips, marrowfat peas), gnocchi in fresh tomato sauce (fricassee of woodland mushrooms, cherry tomatoes, frash basil), and roast lamb à la Dijonnaise (buttered green beans, fondant potato, rosemary roasting juices). Starters include French onion soup with croutons and Gruyère cheese, smoked salmon with garnish and brown bread & butter, and beetroot & goats cheese salad with candied walnuts & merlot vinegar (this dish can be made vegan-friendly). Available desserts include apple & almond crumble with vanilla ice-cream, 70% dark chocolate mousse with crème Chantilly & fresh raspberries, and Mr White’s Classic Cheesecake with fresh blueberry sauce. If you want a Sunday roast, then these are available, with a set menu for one, two, or three courses.

 

Chino Latino

Address: 41 Maid Marian Way, Park Plaza Hotel, Nottingham, NG1 6GD

Found in the Park Plaza Hotel on Maid Marian Way (nearest NET tram stop is Old Market Square), Chino Latino is an AA Rosette-winning restaurant with a focus on pan-Asian cuisine, with influences being taken from Peru. There are three set menus at varying price points, each of which is aimed to be shared between two diners. The à la carte menu has plenty of choices, with starters including gyoza, white miso soup (tofu, spring onion, wakame, enoki mushroom), and sesame prawn spring roll (with garlic & chili sauce, garnished with mooli and sesame seeds). There are a number of sushi available, including tiger maki (prawns, avocado, takuwan, sesame, spicy mayonnaise), and crispy duck roll (pickled plums, spring onion, chili, wasabi, tempura crunch). The sashimi platter can be a good choice for sharing between two people. Main courses include seared salmon (marinated with soy, mirin & miso, edamame purée, shisho leaf, pomegranate and miso with tomato & red onion salsa), slow-cooked prime beef short rib (teriyaki sauce, spring onion, garlic, coriander, chili, lemon juice), and Thai vegetable yellow curry with jasmine rice. Desserts include homemade sorbets and ice-cream, a dessert platter (lemon cheesecake, chocolate fondant, and a selection of sorbets & exotic fruit), and a dessert specials menu with details available on request. 

There are of course many other things to do in Nottingham. If you want to do any shopping, then the two main locations are the Broadmarsh Shopping Centre (nearest station is Nottingham) just to the north of Broadmarsh Bus Station, and the Victoria Centre in the north of the city centre (nearest NET tram stop is Royal Centre). If you want to explore the city’s green spaces, then there are a number of possibilities, including the Meadows Recreation Ground on the banks of the Trent near Trent Bridge (nearest NET tram stop is Meadows Embankment), Holme Pierrepont Country Park (home to the National Watersports Centre) to the south east (accessible by bus), and Gedling Country Park to the north east (accessible by bus).

If the above has helped to convince you that Nottingham is a city worth visiting, then great! Our website is on hand to help you book the best-value train tickets. If you have any questions about your booking, then please get in touch with our customer service team, who will be more than happy to assist you.


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